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Photo#216592
Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia - male

Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia - Male
Near West Richland, Benton County, Washington, USA
July 25, 2008
Size: yellowjacket sized
They clump together at night, and disperse in the day when it gets warm. The yellow and blue together made me question if they were just yellowjackets (apparently not). Now that it is cooler in the mornings, there are very few, and their eyes (entire faces?) are white or light green. I haven't gotten a picture of that yet. The dead ones were put in the freezer overnight, and the colors did not change.

Images of this individual: tag all
Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia - male Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia Sand Wasp in the Subfamily Bembicinae - Steniolia

Moved
Moved from Bembicinae.

Thank you for posting.
Thank you for posting these images here, via WhatsThatBug. These are male and female solitary wasps (well, most of the time they are solitary!) in the genus Steniolia. Up in that corner of the world they are either Steniolia elegans or Steniolia scolopacea albicantia. One of our other wasp experts may be able to say conclusively. The females feed paralyzed flies to their offspring inside the burrows, so nice insects to have around:-)

 
Thanks again.
It's interesting to see the two colors together, plus a comparison of the difference in thorax markings. Apparently, these are a single species. Hope we find out more!

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