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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Species Colaspis pini

Pine Colaspis - Colaspis pini Leaf beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini Leaf Beetle - Colaspis pini
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Chrysomeloidea (Long-horned and Leaf Beetles)
Family Chrysomelidae (Leaf Beetles)
Subfamily Eumolpinae
Tribe Eumolpini
No Taxon (Section Iphimeites)
Genus Colaspis
Species pini (Colaspis pini)
Other Common Names
Pine Colaspis
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Colaspis pini Barber
Identification
Adults are oval, convex, tannish to brown, with metallic greenish specks on their backs. They are about 5 mm long. Mature larvae are yellowish-white, about 6 mm long, with a sparse covering of short hairs and clusters of longer hairs at the outer edge of each body segment.
Season
Adults emerge in late spring to early summer and feed on pine needles, mate and lay eggs in the soil. There is only one generation per year.
Food
Larvae feed in the roots of grasses and other herbaceous vegetation until fall, when they move deeper into the soil to overwinter.
Life Cycle
Larvae spend the winter in cells in the soil, then pupate in the spring.
Remarks
An occasional pest of Christmas trees. Known to feed on most species of Southern pines but rarely causes significant economic injury.
Internet References
Bugwood Wiki - brief description