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Photo#220037
Western Black Widow - Latrodectus geometricus - male - female

Western Black Widow - Latrodectus geometricus - Male Female
La Jolla, San Diego County, California, USA
August 30, 2008
Size: female's body=1/2"
I went out for a walk shortly before midnight and wound up getting a number of interesting nighttime bug photos. I found this grouping of spiders nesting on the overgrown base of a street lamp. I'm still very new to bug identification, but I'm assuming these are widow spiders. Can someone confirm and tell me which species specifically? Thanks!

Images of this individual: tag all
Western Black Widow - Latrodectus geometricus - female Western Black Widow - Latrodectus geometricus - male - female

Moved

correction
i know this is an old one (08), but since it's in the hesperus section, thought i would say something. this spider is actually a geometricus.

 
Right you are,
how could I have been so blind? Anyway, I'm glad you pointed this out!

Looks like a Black Widow,
in our area probably the Western Black Widow. The female is the larger one with the red hour glass spot. The smaller ones are males that will try to mate.
If your photos represent more than one specimen, please separate those as individual posts.
You can obtain more information about your local spider fauna by contacting the San Diego Natural History Museum Entomology Department. They also have a website on arthropods, including spiders: SDNHM.

 
I had not realized that the m
I had not realized that the males were so much smaller than the females.

At first I wasn't sure how I should separate the posts, since I found the spiders all together, but now I've separated them. Thanks for your help!

 
You're welcome -
& its great to see a gradual increase in submissions from CA & other western States.
What looks like little ball-shaped appendages in front of the cephalothorax are the males' pedipalps used in sperm transfer; they're obviously filled for the job ahead.

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