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Photo#220804
Syrphid fly? - Copestylum satur - female

Syrphid fly? - Copestylum satur - Female
Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado, USA
September 1, 2008
Size: ~13mm
Is this a syrphid fly? It was overexposed due to the flash going off, so I did adjust brightness and contrast a bit.

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphid fly? - Copestylum satur - female Syrphid fly? - Copestylum satur - female

Moved
Moved from Copestylum.

Puzzling. I'm having trouble getting past the vivid color.
At first glance, I thought "soldier fly". After looking more closely, I think this is the syrphid Copestylum, though the brightness and relatively simple antennae suggest otherwise. However, I shot something similar recently:



Do you have a shot of the front showing the face? Note the "beak" on mine on the third photo; it's a Copestylum characteristic.

 
Yeah, the color
is crazy bright - not helped by the flash. I did not get a front shot. I was holding the flower stem to steady it in the breeze and moving it around to get better natural light. The fly took off after the second shot. Mine certainly looks very similar to yours. So you think I can at least put it in Syrphidae?

 
Yes, it's a syrphid.
Wing veins confirm that. Oh, and it's a female, from eye spacing.

Just looked again and the beak is there. Put it with Copestylum and hope for some future breakthrough. (Perhaps you and I are on the forefront of nearly fluorescent syrphids. LOL!)

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