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Photo#223917
Singing male  - Oecanthus niveus - male

Singing male - Oecanthus niveus - Male
Bay City, Bay County, Michigan, USA
August 27, 2005
Size: 1 inch body
There are lots of katydids on the Bugguide. I add this 2005 picture for the story. I heard a distinctive and loud insect chirp in my catapla tree for several years. Even on a tall step ladder I could not find the source of the echoing and evasive sound. Then one night I did. The Katydid was poked through a hole in the leaf, which reflected the sound. Knowing what to look for I found others exhibiting the same behavior singing from holes in leaves. Looking for the hole, not the bug, worked for me.

Images of this individual: tag all
Singing male  - Oecanthus niveus - male Singing male - Oecanthus niveus - male Male - Oecanthus niveus - male Singing male - Oecanthus niveus - male

This is a Tree Cricket
Great photos, Steve. Thanks for posting them. The slender silhouette, the overall green color, the pale antennae, and especially the orange on the head which extends as a stripe into the pronotum all point to being a Narrow-winged Tree Cricket. This is a male -- only the males open their wings in this manner to sing. I have seen this use of holes to amplify their song by Two-spotted Tree Crickets, but this is the first time I've seen it for Narrow-winged. I'm studying Tree Crickets, and this is great information to know.

 
Tree Cricket
I had not looked at this since I posted it... almost 9 months ago. Thanks for the response. Great to know the proper identification!

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