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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Species Stictia carolina - Horse Guard Wasp

Horse guard wasp (Stictia sp.) - Stictia carolina - female Horse Guard Wasp - Stictia carolina Wasp - Stictia carolina - male Wasp 071614 - Stictia carolina - female Cicada Killer? - Stictia carolina - female Horse Guard Wasp - Stictia carolina Very large wasp on Heliopsis helianthoides  - Stictia carolina Horse Guard Wasp - Stictia carolina - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
No Taxon (Apoid Wasps (Apoidea)- traditional Sphecidae)
Family Crabronidae
Subfamily Bembicinae
Tribe Bembicini (Sand Wasps)
Subtribe Bembicina
Genus Stictia
Species carolina (Horse Guard Wasp)
Food
Flies, mostly tabanids (80%), occasionally other prey, cicadas and skippers
Remarks
"a really big sand wasp (just behind the cicada killer). They get their name by hanging out around equines and pouncing on tabanids which they paralyze and stuff into their burrows for their offspring."
… Eric R. Eaton

"The horse-guard (Monedula carolina Drury), a predaceous wasp, is among the more important checks on the horsefly. These wasps lay their eggs in burrows and watch over them until they hatch. As soon as larvae appear, the wasps supply them with food, which consists of horsefly adults. The wasp frequents pastures where they pick the flies off the molested horses and cattle and carry them to their nests." -- Bernard Segal, Synopsis of the Tabanidæ of New York, Their Biology and Taxonomy: I. The Genus Chrysops Meigen, Journal of the New York Entomological Society 44(1):51-78 (1936)
Internet References
The Sand Wasps: natural history and behavior. Howard Ensign EVANS, Kevin M. O'Neill