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Species Agrilus subcinctus

Agrilus subcinctus Gory - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus subcinctus Gory - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus subcinctus Gory - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus? - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus? - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus? - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus subcinctus - Metallic Wood-boring Beetle - Agrilus subcinctus Agrilus subcinctus - Metallic Wood-boring Beetle - Agrilus subcinctus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Elateriformia)
Superfamily Buprestoidea (Metallic Wood Boring Beetles)
Family Buprestidae (Metallic Wood-boring Beetles)
Subfamily Agrilinae
Tribe Agrilini
Genus Agrilus
Species subcinctus (Agrilus subcinctus)
Other Common Names
Native Ash Borer (vs. the EAB)
Explanation of Names
Agrilus subcinctus Gory 1841
subcinctus (L). 'under girdled'
Size
~4 mm
Identification

Det. E. G. Riley 2009
Range
e US to NM (NM-FL-NY-NE) (1)
Season
Adults most abundant betw late May and early July in southern Michigan. (Haack & Petrice, 2009)
Food
Larvae host primarily in dead ash twigs - Fraxinus (Oleaceae) (1)
Life Cycle
Biology of Agrilus subcinctus - Robert Haack & Toby Petrice, US Forest Service
Adults fed on ash foliage and laid eggs primarily on recently dead ash twigs. Larvae developed in the phloem of the dead twigs throughout the summer and fall and overwintered as larvae or pupae.
Populations of A. subcinctus increased primarily in areas with an abundance of recently dead ash trees. Given that emerald ash borer (EAB) is killing millions of ash trees, it should be expected that A. subcinctus populations will peak 1 to 2 years behind peak EAB populations. Although not documented yet, we expect A. subcinctus populations to collapse after the ash trees have been dead two or more years given that the phloem tissue will no longer be suitable for A. subcinctus development.
Remarks
at high-moderate risk of endangerment due to the EAB (2)
Internet References
Biology of Agrilus subcinctus - Robert Haack & Toby Petrice, US Forest Service
Works Cited
1.A catalog and bibliography of the Buprestoidea of America north of Mexico.
Nelson et al. 2008. The Coleopterists Society, Special Publication No. 4. 274 pp.
2.Ecological impacts of the emerald ash borer. Pp. 15-62. In: R.G. Van Driesche (ed.), Biology and Control of Emerald Ash Borer.
Wagner, D.L. and K. Todd. 2015. USDA Technical Bulletin FHTET-2014-09. Morgantown, WV.