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Photo#232120
Beetle on Goldenrod - Diabrotica undecimpunctata

Beetle on Goldenrod - Diabrotica undecimpunctata
Simsbury, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
October 8, 2008
Size: approx. 1/4"
Eastern Spotted Cucumber Beetle?

Diabrotica undecimpunctata - Spotted Cucumber Beetle
But I don't know from Eastern? A localized common name, perhaps.

 
Diabrotica undecimpunctata - Spotted Cucumber Beetle
My "Audubon Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders", Copyright 1980, lists the range of Diabrotica undecimpunctata as West of the Rocky Mountains. In the comments section of the text it states: "One of the most destructive beetles is the Eastern Spotted Cucumber Beetle (D. u. howardi) Which is greenish yellow with black spots and has brown and yellow antennae." I'm not sure from my photograph whether there's yellow in the antennae but since my guide is 28 years old, I didn't know whether the range of D. undecimpunctata now includes New England.

 
I'll leave this for the more scientific to sort out.
Please see comments here:


I have a butterfly book dating ca 1977 and am amazed at how many scientific names, including genus, have changed since then. Also, the classifications of many flies are currently in a state of flux, including bee flies, tachinids and, I believe, muscids. I shake my head.

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