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Species Polychrysia esmeralda - Hodges#8901

New Noctuid Moth- Polychrysia esmeralda - Polychrysia esmeralda - female Delphinium Leaftier - Polychrysia esmeralda Polychrysia esmeralda  - Polychrysia esmeralda Polychrysia esmeralda
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea (Owlet Moths and kin)
Family Noctuidae (Owlet Moths)
Subfamily Plusiinae (Looper Moths)
Tribe Plusiini
Subtribe Euchalciina
Genus Polychrysia
Species esmeralda (Polychrysia esmeralda - Hodges#8901)
Hodges Number
8901
Explanation of Names
Polychrysia esmeralda (Oberthür, 1880)
Plusia esmeralda Oberthür, 1880
Deva trabea Smith, 1895
* phylogenetic sequence #931182
Size
forewing length 1.5-1.8 cm (Powell & Opler, 2009)(1)
Range
Alaska south and west across the Canadian prairies to Saskatchewan (Powell & Opler, 2009).
Habitat
Lush meadows and woodland edges in the mountains and foothills, and in flower gardens (E.H. Strickland Museum).
Food
Larvae feed on monkshood (Aconitum sp.) and larkspurs (Delphinium sp.), and are pests on these plants in Edmonton. Adults will visit fireweed (Chamerion sp.) blossoms for nectar (E.H. Strickland Museum).
Life Cycle
Larvae appear around late April or May and burrow into the growing leader of the host plant, causing considerable damage. The spun cocoon made out of fine, gold silk (E.H. Strickland Museum).
Remarks
Adults are easily caught by hand when visiting flowers (E.H. Strickland Museum).
Print References
Lafontaine, J. D. & R. W. Poole 1991. Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 25.1: p.67; pl.1.30-32
Powell, J. A. & P. A. Opler 2009. Moths of Western North America, Pl.49.30f; p.278
Internet References
E.H. Strickland Museum - species page
Works Cited
1.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.