Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Isodontia elegans

another unknown hymenoptera - Isodontia elegans Wasp on Pycnanthemum - Isodontia elegans Wasp - Isodontia elegans Thin waist wasp? - Isodontia elegans Grass-carrying Wasp, Perhaps? - Isodontia elegans Grass-carrying Wasp, Perhaps? - Isodontia elegans Thread-waist wasp on goldenrod - Isodontia elegans Wasp with katydid - Isodontia elegans - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
No Taxon (Apoid Wasps (Apoidea)- traditional Sphecidae)
Family Sphecidae (Thread-waisted Wasps)
Subfamily Sphecinae
Tribe Sphecini
Genus Isodontia (Grass-carrying Wasps)
Species elegans (Isodontia elegans)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
First described in 1856 by Frederick Smith as Sphex elegans
Isodontia elegans
Range
Formerly a Western species, it has been found in the Northeast in the past several years.
Remarks
Coloration is quite variable.
At least part of the genus needs revision. It is possible that elegans (subenus Murrayella) may eventually become a synonym of I. mexicana, or vice versa. (Comments by E. Eaton)
See Also
I. mexicana do not have pale leg segments