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Photo#240727
Coreid - Catorhintha guttula

Coreid - Catorhintha guttula
Marana, Sandario Rd, Pima County, Arizona, USA
November 16, 2008
Size: 9 mm

Moved
Moved from Catorhintha.

Moved

Catorhintha selector --det. J. Botz

 
I really don't think that is correct...
C. selector doesn't have strong lateral antennal spines.

 
So what are you suggesting instead?
back to guttula?

 
My suggestion is guttula or near.
It cannot be selector.

 
I'm moving it back to the genus for now

 
I think guttula is the best.
No other species recorded in the US and Mexico has the antennal spines like this.

 
thank you
I put it back to guttula

Moved

Catorhintha guttula guttula (F.)
Antennal spine shape and size make this guttula. The subspecies are separated by the connexival coloring; C. g. stali has the connexiva bicolored. Reference is Brailovsky & Garcia (1987).

 
Thanks!
So the ones in the guide would be C. g. stali? I was wondering about the bicolored sides of the abdomen.

 
Hypothetically yes...
assuming that they're in the correct place. I suspect they might be C. mendica though. This is a beautiful shot btw.

reminds me somewhat a Catorhintha...
...but let's wait for an expert review

 
I'll follow you...
^^

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