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Species Argyresthia freyella - Hodges#2455

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Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Yponomeutoidea (Ermine Moths and kin)
Family Argyresthiidae (Shiny Head-Standing Moths)
Genus Argyresthia
Species freyella (Argyresthia freyella - Hodges#2455)
Hodges Number
2455
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Argyresthia freyella Walsingham, 1890
* phylogenetic sequence #076600
Explanation of Names
Named in honor of German-born lepidopterist Prof. Heinrich Frey (1822-1890).
Size
Wingspan 8-9 mm. (1)
Range
Roughly from Minnesota south to Dallas, Texas, east to Alabama, northeast to New Jersey, north to New Brunswick and Ontario. (1), (2), (3)
Food
Larval hosts are junipers (Juniperus, Cupressaceae). Forbes reported them on eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) and arborvitae (Thuja). (1), (3)
Life Cycle
Larva makes a spindle-shaped white cocoon with brown spots attached to the outside surface of the foliage included in its web. (4)
Print References
Busck, A. 1907. Revision of the American moths of the genus Argyresthia. Proceedings of the United States National Museum 32: 11 (1)
Forbes, W.T.M. 1923. The Lepidoptera of New York and neighboring states. Cornell University Memoir 68: 346 (3)
Silver, G.T. 1957. Studies on the Arborvitae Leaf Miners in New Brunswick (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae and Gelechiidae). The Canadian Entomologist 89(4): 171-182 (abstract)
Walsingham, Lord 1890. Notes on the genus Argyresthia Hb., with descripions of new species. Insect Life 3(3): 119
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Revision of the American moths of the genus Argyresthia.
August Busck. 1907. Proceedings of the United States National Museum 32: 5-24, pl.4-5.
2.North American Moth Photographers Group
3.The Lepidoptera of New York and Neighboring States
William T.M. Forbes. 1923. Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; Memoir 68.
4.Caterpillars on the Foliage of Conifers in the Northeastern United States (Revised).
Chris T. Maier, Carol R. Lemmon, Jeff. M. Fengler, Dale F. Schweitzer. Richard, C. Reardon. 2011. USDA FHTET-2011-07: 1-153.