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Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


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Species Calosoma sycophanta - Caterpillar Searcher

Forest Caterpillar Hunter Calosoma sycophanta - Calosoma sycophanta Forest Caterpillar Hunter - Calosoma sycophanta - Calosoma sycophanta Forest Caterpillar Hunter - Calosoma sycophanta - Calosoma sycophanta Metallic Green Beetle carrying egg - Calosoma sycophanta
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Adephaga (Ground and Water Beetles)
Family Carabidae (Ground Beetles)
Subfamily Carabinae
Tribe Carabini
Genus Calosoma (Caterpillar Hunter Beetles)
No Taxon (Subgenus Calosoma)
Species sycophanta (Caterpillar Searcher)
Other Common Names
Forest Caterpillar Hunter
Explanation of Names
Calosoma sycophanta (Linnaeus 1758)
Range
native to w. Palaearctic (east to Siberia)(1); introduced intentionally and established in e.US (so.ME-MD-WV-w.PA)(2)
Life Cycle
Adults spend winter in the soil. Emerge in June and hunt for spongy moth caterpillars (Lymantria dispar). Its life history is closely synchronized with that of spongy moths and this is why it is thought that it is not likely to cause damage to other caterpillars.
Remarks
Introduced in 1905 to control spongy moth (Lymantria dispar) and Euproctis chrysorrhoea(2)
See Also
C. aurocinctum (restricted to TX)
Internet References
Fact sheet (U. of Wisconsin)