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Photo#246102
Unidentified Isopoda (Woodlouse/Pillbug) - Ligidium gracile

Unidentified Isopoda (Woodlouse/Pillbug) - Ligidium gracile
Silver Falls State Park, near Stayton, Marion County, Oregon, USA
December 13, 2008
Size: ~5mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Unidentified Isopoda (Woodlouse/Pillbug) - Ligidium gracile Unidentified Isopoda (Woodlouse/Pillbug) - Ligidium gracile

Moved
Moved from Ligidium.

Moved
Moved from Malacostracans.

Ligidium
Hi! This is a Ligidium sp. from the family Ligiidae. One good mark that helps in identification:

Ligiidae (e.g. Ligia, Ligidium) species have many ocelli in the eye, while Trichoniscus sp. have only three.

You don't obviously see the ocelli, but the AREA of the eyes tells a lot. When they cover a considerable area on the head (like here), one can assume it's MORE than three.


Three ocelli are almost not visible, you see only a little black dot on the head.

 
Sweet!
Very nice, both of you! They are very similar and I wouldn't have been able to find the right genus or family. I was almost sure the pygmy was correct and until you mentioned the eye size & ocelli, I didn't see the difference. Thank you very much

Pygmy
This is what I would call a 'pygmy' woodlouse, family Trichoniscidae.
However, I cannot be 100% sure, so you'll need the word of someone else to verify this.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/55260/bgpage

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