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Species Glena quinquelinearia - Five-lined Gray - Hodges#6453

Five-lined Gray - Glena quinquelinearia - male possible-Glena quinquelinearia - Glena quinquelinearia Five-lined Gray - Hodges#6453 (Glena quinquelinearia) - Glena quinquelinearia - male Glena quinquelinearia - male Moth - Common Wave? - Glena quinquelinearia #6453 - Glena quinquelinearia - Glena quinquelinearia - male Glena quinquelinearia Glena quinquelinearia? - Glena quinquelinearia
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Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Geometroidea (Geometrid and Swallowtail Moths)
Family Geometridae (Geometrid Moths)
Subfamily Ennominae
Tribe Boarmiini
Genus Glena
Species quinquelinearia (Five-lined Gray - Hodges#6453)
Hodges Number
6453
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Glena quinquelinearia (Packard, 1874)
Cymatophora 5-linearia Packard, 1874
Ectropis quinque-linearia
Boarmia quinquelinearia
Alcis quinquelinearia
Monroa quinquelinearia
Cleora quinquelinearia
Phylogenetic sequence #191325
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet quinquelinearia is Latin meaning "five-lined."
Gray is a common name that Covell (1984) applied to a number of Geomentrid genera including Glena. (1)
Size
Forewing length: ♂ 12-16 mm, ♀ 13-18 mm. (2)
Range
Texas to New Mexico (2)
Season
Adults fly March through July.
Remarks
Type Specimen at MCZ, Harvard
See Also
Glena macdunnougharia is most similar, including having a banded abdomen, however it is paler overall in color, the male antennae pectinations are longer, and it is generally found west of the range of quinquelinearia. (2)
Glena interpunctata is similar but is described by Sperry (1952) as lacking black and white banding of the abdomen, and the median line when present tends to converge with PM line toward the inner margin. Rindge (1965) appears to concur with the Sperry description. (3)(2)
Glena plumosaria is an Eastern species
Print References
Rindge, F.H. 1965. A revision of the Nearctic species of Glena (Lepidoptera, Geometridae). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 129(3): 298 (PDF) (2)
Sperry, J.L. 1952. Notes on the genus Glena Hulst and description of new species (Lepidoptera, Geometridae). Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences 51: 71-78 (3)
Works Cited
1.Field Guide to Moths of Eastern North America
Charles V. Covell, Jr. 2005.
2.A revision of the Nearctic species of the genus Glena (Lepidoptera: Geometridae)
Frederick H. Rindge. 1965. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 129(3).
3.Notes on the Genus Glena Hulst and Descriptions of New Species (Lepidoptera, Geometridae)
John L. Sperry. 1952. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Science, 51:71-78.