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TaxonomyBrowse
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Subfamily Asopinae - Predatory Stink Bugs

Unknown... - Picromerus bidens Predatory Bug - Podisus Podisus maculiventris ? - Podisus maculiventris Predatory Stink Bug? - Podisus serieventris A stinkbug - ID please. - Podisus maculiventris Euthyrhynchus floridanus? - Euthyrhynchus floridanus shield/stink bug - Oplomus dichrous Ornate orange and black beetle - Alcaeorrhynchus grandis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily Pentatomoidea
Family Pentatomidae (Stink Bugs)
Subfamily Asopinae (Predatory Stink Bugs)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
no generally accepted tribal arrangement exists
Explanation of Names
Asopinae Spinola 1850
Numbers
35 spp. in 16 genera in our area(1), ~300 spp. in 66 genera worldwide(2)
Identification
easily recognized by the free first segment of the rostrum(3); rostrum enlarged, very little of it fits between bucculae(4)
see(5)
"In identifying asopines it helps to be color blind" (D.B. Thomas)
Range
worldwide and throughout NA(1)
Food
Predatory, unlike other stink bugs; feed on other insects. Prey is primarily slow-moving soft-bodied insects, especially larvae. Most are generalist predators.
Remarks
Several species are used in Integrated Pest Management. Some are commercially available, e. g. Podisus maculiventris.
Works Cited
1.American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico
Ross H. Arnett. 2000. CRC Press.
2.Rider D. (2006-2013) Pentatomoidea home page
3.An updated synopsis of the Pentatomoidea (Heteroptera) of Michigan
Swanson D.R. 2012. Great Lakes Entomologist 45: 263-311.
4.The Heteroptera (Hemiptera) of North Dakota I: Pentatomomorpha: Pentatomoidea
Rider D.A. 2012. Great Lakes Entomologist 45: 312-380.
5.Taxonomic synopsis of the asopine Pentatomidae (Heteroptera) of the western hemisphere
Thomas D.B. 1992. Entomological Society of America (Thomas Say Monograph), Lantham, MD. 156 pp.