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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Species Scotophaeus blackwalli

Spider help please! - Scotophaeus blackwalli Is this Callobius? - Scotophaeus blackwalli Mouse Spider - Scotophaeus blackwalli - male Mouse Spider, ventral - Scotophaeus blackwalli - female Found this in on the wall of our upstairs hall.  - Scotophaeus blackwalli Big dark spider - Scotophaeus blackwalli - female Protective Mother - Scotophaeus blackwalli The Offspring - Scotophaeus blackwalli
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Araneae (Spiders)
Infraorder Araneomorphae (True Spiders)
No Taxon (Entelegynae)
Family Gnaphosidae (Ground Spiders)
Genus Scotophaeus
Species blackwalli (Scotophaeus blackwalli)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes

Scotophaeus blackwalli (Thorell, 1871)
Size
Female 9-12 mm; male 7-10 mm (J. Lissner)
Identification
Orange-brown covered with grey hairs; abdomen often has a silky-grey appearance, reminiscent of a mouse.

Male pedipalp:
Habitat
Synanthropic in North America.
Remarks
This spider was apparently introduced from Europe and is found around buildings on the Pacific Coast.
Internet References
Series of photos (including some from other BG contributors) here.
~ www.spiders.us - Image and detailed information.