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Photo#249054
Tree Cricket - Oecanthus fultoni - male

Tree Cricket - Oecanthus fultoni - Male
Henrietta, Monroe County, New York, USA
August 23, 2008
I believe this is a tree cricket (Oecanthus species), but I don't know which one. This is a completely new group for me, and it took me quite a while just to find the right order.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tree Cricket - Oecanthus fultoni - male Tree Cricket - Oecanthus fultoni - male Tree Cricket - Oecanthus fultoni - male

Moved
Moved from Oecanthus.

O. latipennis?
I'm thinking this is the broad-winged tree cricket, but do wait for confirmation from others.

 
I would vote that it looks more like O. fultoni....
...based on the orange on the head and lack of red on the proximal antennae. Broad-winged tree crickets have dark red on the antennae beyond the pedicel.



While these photos look like the wings are very broad -- the Snowy Tree Cricket also has quite wide wings. I HAVE NOT PERSONALLY inspected an O. latipennis, but photos I have seen seem to show the widest part of the wings are a >3:1 size ratio as opposed to O. fultoni which is closer to a 2.5:1 ratio. (This is not a scientific description -- just my own observations). Also, this TC has VERY pale limbs and antennae -- which is consistent with Snowy Tree Cricket. A photo of the antennal markings on the first 2 antennal segments would be ideal to make an ID.

 
:-)
I so-o-o-o defer to the Tree Cricket Goddess:-) LOL! No, seriously, you point out some very interesting differences. I'll have to go check my own specimens from Cincinnati now....

 
:D
I don't claim to be an expert....YET ! If I SEEM to know quite a bit about Oecanthinae -- it's probably a combination of sheer obsession and the fact that there are only 17 species to study !

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