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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Tipula abdominalis - Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly - Tipula abdominalis Large crane fly - Tipula abdominalis - male Crane Fly - Tipula abdominalis crane fly larva ID? - Tipula abdominalis Unknown aquatic maggot - Tipula abdominalis Found in Sycamore IL - Tipula abdominalis Unknown insect that resembles a crane fly  - Tipula abdominalis - female Tipula abdominalis - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Nematocera" (Non-Brachycera))
Infraorder Tipulomorpha (Crane Flies)
Family Tipulidae (Large Crane Flies)
Subfamily Tipulinae
Genus Tipula
No Taxon (subgenus Nippotipula)
Species abdominalis (Giant Crane Fly)
Size
female max. body length at least 45 mm; max. wing length at least 30 mm; max. legspan (front to back) at least 115 mm
male is usually smaller
Identification
Large size coupled with black velvety patches on thorax is diagnostic feature for subgenus Nippotipula. Tipula abdominalis has a spot at the end of vein R1+2 and pale rings near tips of femora.
Range
eastern North America
Habitat
adults often attracted to light
Season
adults fly from May to October
Life Cycle
two generations per year (usually May/June and September/October)
See Also
female Tipula (Vestiplex) longiventris is almost as large but lacks black thoracic patches and has only one generation per year (in May and June)
Internet References
adult image and information on biology, life history, etc. (Barbara Strnadova, New York)
adult image (Bill Johnson, Minnesota)