Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#250044
Pupal cases? - Coleophora serratella

Pupal cases? - Coleophora serratella
South Frontenac, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada
Size: 1 cm
I found dozens of these affixed to the terminal twigs of a White (Paper) Birch overhanging a small lake. It looked like there were perhaps two types, cocoons and eggs? Long cigar-shaped papery things, and then shorter hard-looking claw-shaped things. They occurred singly or in groups of two or more.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pupal cases? - Coleophora serratella Pupal cases? - Coleophora serratella Pupal cases? - Coleophora serratella

Moved
Moved from Casebearer Moths.
I believe these are all Coleophora serratella. This is the only species known to make a tubular (as opposed to spatulate) leaf case on birch, and when younger it makes a strongly curved, composite leaf case.

Some are...
some aren't. It does look like there are some cocoons in there, but they would never vary in size. It does look like the cocoons are mimicking the natural growths, which look like little overwintering flower buds. The one in the lower right even looks like it has started to unfurl just a litte...or is this just me?

 
I think it's an artifact of the FOV
I think it's just the really shallow field of view in the photo (an unfortunate consequence of the wide aperture I had to use to get enough light to photograph them). The buds were all much larger than that, and reddish. Some of the cases seemed to be open at one end, like their occupants had already left, while others didn't have as obvious an opening. The ones that puzzled me were the little short curved ones.

 
right, which is why I thought
right, which is why I thought they would be growing out of the plant...but I'm certainly no botanist.

Hows that moth book coming?

 
Fairly well! We've found it a
Fairly well! We've found it a home in the Peterson Field Guide series (probably as a large-size book, like their new Birds they just released), and it should be published in the second half of 2010. Our deadline is next summer for all our materials, etc. A little bit of a longer schedule than I'd first envisioned when contacting folks back last spring, but on the up side it gives us more time to make sure we've got the best photos and data available to us.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.