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Species Gryllus rubens - Eastern Trilling Cricket

Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Cricket 01 - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Gryllus rubens - female Eastern Trilling Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Gryllus rubens - male Gryllus rubens - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids)
Suborder Ensifera (Long-horned Orthoptera)
Infraorder Gryllidea (Crickets)
Family Gryllidae (True Crickets)
Subfamily Gryllinae (Field Crickets)
Genus Gryllus (Field Crickets)
Species rubens (Eastern Trilling Cricket)
Other Common Names
Southeastern Field Cricket
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Gryllus rubens Scudder 1902
Habitat
Southeastern U.S. from Missouri south and east to coast from eastern Texas to Deleware/Virginia. Recently found in Ohio as well.
Life Cycle
Apparently multiple broods, or long-lived, with adults possible year-round in far south. However, adults are most abundant and prevalent in spring. Probably overwinters primarily as nymphs.
Remarks
Very like Gryllus texensis and integer, which are found mostly further west; however, those species sing with a less continuous trilling, making the western "species" sound as if they are missing on one cylinder, or stuttering slowly - just a bit. G. rubens tends to have a continuous song with few or no interruptions until it stops. These three are very similar, and perhaps (???) regional variants of one (or two) species.