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Photo#251461
Midge Fly - Chironomus - male

Midge Fly - Chironomus - Male
Kenner, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, USA
January 27, 2009

Images of this individual: tag all
Midge Fly - Chironomus - male Midge Fly - Chironomus - male Midge Fly - Chironomus - male Midge Fly - Chironomus - male Midge Fly - Chironomus - male

Moved
Moved from Chironominae.

Appendages
One of the characters used to separate related genera is the widening of one of the sets of appendages at the tip, the smaller pair inside the large pair. In Dicrotendipes they expand at the tip and have a tuft of hairs there. In Chironomus they are more even and the hairs are not so concentrated. Due to the angle it's hard to tell how wide the base of the appendage is; that's why I wondered if the top view could be cropped more.

 
Again, thanks for your time with this...
I changed the image here. It seems that the ones with the best focus on the terminalia are all side shots :(

The above is a dorsal view but , obviously, out of focus. I doubt it is enough but I though I would give it a shot.

No pressure intended but if you can get it figured out I will put some of these images in the guide. If not, I see no reason to keep them.

Good luck and thanks again!!

 
Original
Can you add back the original and keep this one? I think they may both be helpful.

This is likely a Chironomus.

 
It is back...
:)

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