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Photo#251964
Xero-like female - Anoplius apiculatus - female

Xero-like female - Anoplius apiculatus - Female
Holla Bend NWR, Pope County, Arkansas, USA
July 4, 2006
Size: 9.5mm
Apical terminal bristles.

Images of this individual: tag all
Xero-like female - Anoplius apiculatus - female Xero female - Anoplius apiculatus - female Xero-like female - Anoplius apiculatus - female

It's enough...
to call it Anoplius, though. They appear to be stiff and directed caudad, although not distinct they are clearly different than the normal setae also seen on the apicotergite. It's not the distinct, dark bundle of stiff setae found on its Arachnophroctonus counterparts. I've had trouble with some A. semirufus that almost keyed out to Arachnospila michiganensis because they few stiff setae were broken off, but as soon as I zoomed in on the pygidial area the bases of the setae were visible.

Puzzling.
I would not call this "spinose," either. Tends to send the thing back to Pompilus....Good idea to send the specimen to Nick:-) I did confirm that the specimen I was working on is truly Xerochares, so you can see what 'that' looks like now (larger, all-red abdomen, etc). Fascinating....

 
Did you
Post a spec shot of the Xero? Or send me one.

 
It's on the species page.
Margarethe Brummermann had posted the specimen several months ago, and I just finally got around to keying it. So even though you took your images off the page, hers are now there instead. Still doesn't do justice to the wasp, though:-)

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