Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Psyche casta - Common Bagworm Moth - Hodges#0437

Psychidae moth to identify... - Psyche casta Who done it? - Psyche casta moth? - Psyche casta mystery object miniature larvae - Psyche casta unknown case- resident? - Psyche casta Psyche casta Psyche casta - female Common Bagworm Moth - Psyche casta - male
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tineoidea (Tubeworm, Bagworm, and Clothes Moths)
Family Psychidae (Bagworm Moths)
Subfamily Psychinae
Genus Psyche
Species casta (Common Bagworm Moth - Hodges#0437)
Hodges Number
0437
Identification


Larval case "approximately 9-13 mm long. Silk of whitish grey, heavily covered by small pieces of plant fragments, usually by segments of grass stems, arranged longitudinally, often surpassing length of case, projecting in irregular fashion posteriorly." (Davis 1964)

See discussion here for comparison to the most similar native species, Astala confederata.
Range
Introduced from Europe. First discovered in Boston in 1931. By 1964 the range extended from southeastern Canada to eastern Pennsylvania. BugGuide data indicates it has expanded west to Illinois and Minnesota, with one apparent example in Washington state.
Food
Chiefly "grasses, mosses, lichens, and other low plants"; occasionally scale insects. (Davis 1964)
Life Cycle
1. Larval case. 2. Larva. 3. Pupa. 4. Adult female. 5. Adult male
Print References
Davis 1964 "Bagworm moths of the western hemisphere." Bulletin of the United States National Museum 244, 233 pages
Internet References