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Species Ypsolopha canariella - Canary Ypsolopha - Hodges#2371

Ypsolopha canariella Ypsolopha canariella Canary Ypsolopha  - Ypsolopha canariella Canary Ypsolopha Moth - Ypsolopha canariella Canary Ypsolopha Moth - Ypsolopha canariella Canary Ypsolopha Moth - Ypsolopha canariella Canary Ypsolopha - Ypsolopha canariella i suspected this to be Pleromelloida conserta, but it pupated at a very small size so now i have no clue.  Hope it will rear out - Ypsolopha canariella
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Yponomeutoidea (Ermine Moths and kin)
Family Ypsolophidae
Genus Ypsolopha
Species canariella (Canary Ypsolopha - Hodges#2371)
Hodges Number
2371
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Ypsolopha canariella (Walsingham, 1881)
Cerostoma canariella Walsingham, 1881 (1)
Phylogenetic sequence #360044
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet from Latin meaning "canary" for the "canary-yellow" head, thorax and forewings. (1)
Size
Walsingham (1881) listed the wingspan about 19-21 mm. (1)
Identification
Adult - forewing yellow with reddish-brown triangular area in middle of wing; hindwing white or pale gray, semitransparent, with long fringe.
Range
Most of United States, and across Canada from Quebec to British Columbia.
Bug Guide map - range map with monthly record of photos submitted to the guide.
Moth Photographers Group - large range map with collection dates.
Habitat
Various: mixed wood forests, semi-arid scrubland, prairies, badlands; adults are nocturnal and come to light. (2)
Season
Adults fly from May to September.
Food
Larvae feed on leaves of willow (Salix spp.) and honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) and flowers of common snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus). (2)
Remarks
Ypsolopha dentiferella was designated by Walsingham, 1881:107 as the type for the Ypsolopha dentiferella group which also includes frustella and canariella.
Per Powell & Opler (2009), Ypsolopha dentiferella, frustella and canariella may be conspecific.(3) BOLD mtDNA data seems to support that conjecture. As of 2016, the BIN group, BOLD:AAC0506, contains all three species with all three placed randomly in the TaxonID Tree.
See Also
Ypsolopha dentiferella - see "Remarks" above
Ypsolopha frustella - see "Remarks" above
Ypsolopha dentella forewing mostly brown, with longitudinal yellow strip along lower third.
Print References
Walsingham, T. de Grey. 1881. On some North-American Tineidae. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1881: 309; pl. 35, f.11. (1)
Works Cited
1.On some North-American Tineidae.
Lord Walsingham. 1881. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1881: 301-324, Pl.35,36.
2.University of Alberta Entomology Collection
3.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
4.North American Moth Photographers Group
5.BOLD: The Barcode of Life Data Systems