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Photo#25423
Flower Beetles 3 - Anastrangalia laetifica - male - female

Flower Beetles 3 - Anastrangalia laetifica - Male Female
Selma, Josephine County, Oregon, USA
June 26, 2005

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Flower Beetles 3 - Anastrangalia laetifica - male - female Flower Beetles 3 - Anastrangalia laetifica - male - female Flower Beetles 3 - Anastrangalia laetifica

Calochortus Pollinators?
Nice beetles! Looks like they're covered w/ pollen, perhaps from that beautiful Globe Lily (Calochortus sp.) they're rolling around in. Wonder if either of them visited another Calochortus flower afterwards and transfered some pollen?

 
Certainly highly likely
There were plenty of Calochortus howellii around and plenty of beetles. We'll post two images to frass to illustrate.

 
Wow! That's great :-)
What a treat! I've never seen Calochortus howellii before. I don't think we have it in California (it's not in the Jepson Manual anyway)...though a plant enthusiast friend has mentioned it to me before. Thank's for sharing this J & J :-)

Mating pair.
This is a great shot showing the sexual dimorphism in this flower longhorn species, which, if memory serves, is Anastrangalia laetifica, not an uncommon insect in the Pacific Northwest.

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