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Photo#256329
Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus

Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus
Valsetz, Polk County, Oregon, USA
February 28, 2009
Size: ~1.5cm

Images of this individual: tag all
Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus Predacious Diving Beetle lavae (Colymbetinae?) - Agabus

Moved
Moved from Agabus.

Moved
Moved from Colymbetinae.

Yes, Colymbetinae
Maybe something from Ilybius or Agabus but can't confirm without a good lateral shot of the head and a better view of the cerci.

 
ok,
will these work?
Thanks,
Mark

 
Thanks
This is most likely an Agabus based on technical features of the head. The lack of a horizontal lateral keel and a row of small spines that run in an oblique angle from the back of the head to far below the eye, as visible in the close-up lateral view (not to the eye as in Ilybius) characterize the genus. Also both the habitat (some Agabus are lotic, Ilybius are mainly lentic- living in standing water) and life history pattern (some species overwinter as larvae) support the ID.

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