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Photo#257412
.Elongate-bodied Springtail - Isotomidae - Folsomia prima

.Elongate-bodied Springtail - Isotomidae - Folsomia prima
Baiting Hollow, Suffolk County, New York, USA
March 7, 2009
Size: 1.5 mm
Found in leaf litter.
I think this photo was probably taken by my daughter, Jennifer Dickert. We were passing the camera back and forth.

Images of this individual: tag all
.Elongate-bodied Springtail - Isotomidae - Folsomia prima .Elongate-bodied Springtail - Isotomidae - Folsomia prima

Moved
Moved from Folsomia.

Folsomia prima
In the mean time I could figure out the species.
This species was collected from New York state by Maynard in 1951 under the name Folsomia silvestrii. But in 1980 Christiansen & Bellinger sunk silvestrii to synonymy with prima.
This Folsomia species has a very characteristic white and black banding: each segment has an anterior white band and posterior black band at the segment margins.

 
Folsomia prima
Thanks, Frans, for the added species ID and comments. I did not expect it to get this far!

I like the pattern on the head and face. Is this representative of the species or of the genus in general?

Also, are you able to tell if this is an adult or an instar?

 
Folsomia
is diagnosed by the fused 4th to 6th abdominal segments.
The face pattern is not diagnostic.

BTW, 'instar' is a term used to specify a moulting stage. As you know arthropods do not grow continuously (as we do) but grow discontinuously by moulting. After each moult the specimen remains some time in this new moulting stage. Then it will moult again. The stage/phase the specimen is in between two moults is called an 'instar'. Remember Collembola keep on moulting even when adult (contrary to most insects, and more in line with crustaceans). So in Collembola we have juvenile and adult instars. Some species have only 10 instar forms during their life, while others can have 100 instars.
In some species the instars have distinctly different colours and/or patterns. That explains the infraspecific variability in many species. In other species the differences are indistinct.
In summary: an instar = a specimen in a certain stage inbetween 2 subsequent moults.

To come back to your question: I assume it is adult given it matches the description of the species in the literature (which is conventionally based only on adults).

 
Folsomia
Very interesting information. Thank you for taking the time and I would never have imagined that some could possibly have 100 instars since they don't grow to be very large. I wonder why that would be beneficial and necessary in some cases..

 
When Collembola moult...
at least 2 things happen that can be considered benificial:
1. broken appendages may be (partly) recovered
2. in the skin layer deposited waste material is removed
In this way, by moulting more frequently, Collembola may survive longer in 'unfriendly' or contaminated environments.

 
Moulting Benefits - Thanks for this info.
Amazing adaptation and also amazing that people have figured this out.

Considering current Earth conditions it would be beneficial if Homo Sapiens could also learn to moult.

Moved
Moved from Isotomidae.

Moved

Folsomia sp.
if it is true that the 4th to 6th abdominal segments are fused (as apparently in this specimen).
Indeed it belongs to the family Isotomidae. Well done, Lynn!

 
Etymology
Is genus Folsomia named for Justus Folsom?

 
Indeed, John
It is named in honour of that famous US collembologist.

 
Folsomia sp.
Folsomia sp. - Thank you Frans. I think this is the same as the last Isotomidae that I posted, but a better photo. They were both from under the same tree and each time I only found one indiviual in my sample.

Should this go on a Folsoma page and if so do we have one?
Moving to Isotomidae for now.

 
Folsomia prima
This Folsomia species has a very characteristic white and black banding: each segment has an anterior white band and posterior black band at the segment margins. In your previous isotomid picture such banding is absent.

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