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Photo#258405
Robber Fly - Megaphorus clausicellus

Robber Fly - Megaphorus clausicellus
Lake Placid - Archbold, Highlands County, Florida, USA
September 6, 2008
Smaller robber fly waiting for lunch to fly by.

Images of this individual: tag all
Robber Fly - Megaphorus clausicellus Robber Fly - Megaphorus clausicellus Robber Fly - Megaphorus clausicellus

Moved

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so cool!

 
Yes.
Superior images, Tim.

 
Thank you for the kind words,
Thank you for the kind words, can anyone narrow down what kind of robber fly this is?

 
Megaphorus laphroides
It's a robber fly in the genus Megaphorus, a group of very similar bee mimics. I think the black hair the length of the tibiae makes it M. laphroides. The flying picture showing it using all its legs to grasp its prey is spectacular. I expect it was a good deal smaller than the 1.5 to 2 inches suggested.

 
Thank you
Thank you very much for the ID. You are probably right about the size, I often leave the size blank as I am not confident in my ability to estimate small sizes with my eye pressed to the viewfinder. I will edit to remove the size estimate.

 
Mega mistake
I wasn't thinking straight. Sorry. The tibiae are not black but yellow, and that suggests that this is, instead, M. clausicellus.

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