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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#25917
R. fasciatus? - Ripiphorus fasciatus-complex - female

R. fasciatus? - Ripiphorus fasciatus-complex - Female
Bethlehem, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA
July 18, 2005
The antennae are comb shaped.

Images of this individual: tag all
R. fasciatus? - Ripiphorus fasciatus-complex - female R. fasciatus? - Ripiphorus fasciatus-complex - female

Moved
Moved from Ripiphorus.

Ripiphorus sp., female
Tom, et al.-

This is a female of the genus Ripiphorus, family Ripiphoridae. The taxonomy for the East Coast species is an utter mess, so I doubt I can get a confident name on this once I hit my references tomorrow. The safest thing to do is punt and call it R. fasciatus? but that's just a place-holder name.

These critters are fun in that the adults only live about 1 day in the field (up to 3 days under controlled conditions) and are parasitoids of ground-nesting bees. Not a lot is known about them, but their story, such as it is, is fascinating. I've been waiting for someone to snap a pic of this genus- the first for this guide!

cheers,

 
seconded
Rh. fasciatus complex

 
Never would have guessed
that this was a beetle. It's life story sounds as odd as it looks. Thanks for the ID Zack.

Oddfly
Perhaps an unusual sawfly??

 
Looks somewhat
like an Introduced Pine Sawfly male, but a little different.

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