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Family Corduliidae - Emeralds

Hine's Emerald - Somatochlora hineana Brush-tipped emerald? - Somatochlora walshii - female exuvia on Juncus stalk - Epitheca Ocellated Emerald - Somatochlora minor - male Dragonfly ID 042213 - Epitheca costalis - male Dragonfly - Epitheca Sepia Baskettail - Epitheca sepia - male Somatochlora tenebrosa? - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies)
Suborder Anisoptera (Dragonflies)
Family Corduliidae (Emeralds)
Explanation of Names
Named for the bright emerald metalic green eyes.
Numbers
50 spp. in 7 genera in our area(1), ca. 400 spp. in almost 50 genera of 6 subfamilies worldwide(2)(3)
Size
medium to large sized dragonflies, 35 to 68 mm long.
Identification
Usually have bright emerald metallic green eyes and sometimes thorax (although some species are duller).
Eyes touch for a fair section.

Best diagnosed to family by the wing patterns: dissimilar wing triangles and anal loop (in the hind wing) that is foot shaped but without a distinct toe. (4)

Individual species can be identified by the males tail appendages , or the females genitalia plates , , . A good field guide will have drawings of these features to assist with identification of each species.
Range
worldwide(3)
Remarks
Prefer to hang rather than perch. Often perch on vegetation or stems on an 45 deg angle.
Print References
(4)
Works Cited
1.Dragonfly Society of the Americas. 2012. North American Odonata
2.Australian Faunal Directory
3.Dragonflies of the World
Jill Silsby. 2001. Smithsonian Institution Press.
4.Field Guide to The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Algonquin Provincial Park and the Surrounding Area
Colin D. Jones, Andrea Kingsley, Peter Burke, and Matt Holder. 2008. Friends of Algonquin.