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Photo#262808
Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio

Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio
Chantilly, Fairfax County, Virginia, USA
April 2, 2009
Size: ~ 8-9 mm
Found under the bark of a tree. Can I have any chance to get a genus/species ID?

Images of this individual: tag all
Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio Tumbling flower beetle (Mordellidae) ??? - Eucinetus morio

Thanks, v and Skip!
My guess is far from the reality. :(

You're right!
I cannot confirm morio but the evidence for Eucinetus (if I had been more careful) is there to be seen. I guess I was too eager to find something that fit the size estimate better.

You're right!
I cannot confirm morio but the evidence (if I had been more careful) is there to be seen. Does make one wonder about the size estimate, though.

I vote for Eustrophopsis bicolor
It agrees better with the size estimate, too.

 
that was my first impression, too, BUT:
[1] WonGun knows the eustrophines (posted a pic recently) and, with his good eye, wouldn't make such a mistake;
[2] I can't see here enough detail, but i do see strigose elytra highly typical for eucinetids
[3] body/pronotum outline is distinctive, antennae too thin for a eustrophine
[4] conclusive argument: metacoxal plates perfectly seen here:
Bottomline: I'm pretty sure this is Eucinetus morio LeConte 1853

 
Eucinetus morio LeConte
Agreed: this is definitely Eucinetus morio LeConte.

can't be this big
i'm thinking Eucinetus

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