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Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


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Family Pieridae - Whites, Sulphurs, Yellows

Cloudless Sulphur? - Phoebis sennae - female Cabbage White - Pieris rapae Dead and Beautiful - Colias eurytheme Yellow butterfly with pointed wing - Zerene cesonia - female Mexican Yellow - Eurema mexicana Falcate Orangetips courting - Anthocharis midea - male - female Orange or clouded sulphur - Colias philodice small pale yellow butterfly - Eurema daira
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Papilionoidea (Butterflies and Skippers)
Family Pieridae (Whites, Sulphurs, Yellows)
Other Common Names
Pierids
Numbers
~60 spp. in 16 genera in our area, ~1,100 spp. in ~80 genera total
Identification
Adults, medium to small wings white, yellow, or orange, with some black or red; many have hidden ultraviolet patterns used in courtship.
Food
larval hosts are mostly Brassicaceae; for most Sulphurs, Fabaceae
Life Cycle
There may be more than one generation per year. Females lay columnar eggs on leaves, buds or stems. Usually overwinter as larvae or pupae.