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Photo#26685
Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Ele*odes

Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Ele*odes
Size: 39 - 40 mm
I was surprised to find this big mite-covered larva in the same container as my California Eleo*des, which I've had since March '05. I then recalled that I had put several Alo*bates pennsyl*vanica in with the Ele*odes and guessed that one of them had laid an egg that had produced this larva. Yet something (besides the mites) looked different about this larva. Examining photos of A. pennsyl*vanica, I noticed that, while A. pennsyl*vanica has a double hook on its posterior, it's not nearly so well-developed as on this larva.

At any rate, I consider it possible that the Eleodes was a gravid female and laid an egg after I placed it in its container. I suspect that this larva has been feeding on the rolled oats I give to the Eleodes because I find it most frequently lurking just below the feeding station.

Images of this individual: tag all
Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Ele*odes Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Eleodes Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Eleodes Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Eleodes Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Eleodes Large tenebrionid larva, possibly Ele*odes

Moved
Moved from Coelometopinae.

Moved
Moved from Synchroa punctata.

Moved
Moved from Synchroa Bark Beetles. Moved per request here. Should this image be moved back to Coelometopinae where the rest of the linked images currently reside?

Moved
Moved from Coelometopinae.

Moved
Moved from Darkling Beetles.

Aug. 10, 2005 update
This larva is still alive and vigorous. I have seen it romping over the surface of the rotten wood debris in the container, rearing up every so often to determine if there is anything above it. When handled, it makes agressive use of its posterior spines, prodding my fingers to get me to leave it alone. I have washed it, scrubbed it with a bottle brush and rubbed it with my fingers trying to free it from some of the young mites it carries, all to little avail. After a minute or so of fighting me, it goes catatonic for a while, sometimes for over a minute after I stop handling it.

Besides the adult Eleodes sp., the larva now has some small ground beetles for company: a dozen or so Bembi*dion varie*gatum and one Notio*philus sp. The normal habitat for B. varie*gatum is sand, which their markings enable them to blend in with when they freeze motion. They won't have any enemies in the container though. I introduced them in hopes they would gobble up the rampant population of spring*tails. I'm afraid I haven't watched them enough to say if they're eating them at all. The springtails swarm over any foodstuffs I place in the container.

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