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Photo#274814
Cecidomyiidae, galls on Lead Plant - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha

Cecidomyiidae, galls on Lead Plant - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha
Weaver Dunes, Wabasha County, Minnesota, USA
August 6, 2008
Size: 4 mm
Distinctive red conical galls on Amorpha canescens
Felt says in "Plant Galls & Gall Makers" (p 276) that it is a midge, Diarthrohomyia sp.
Gagne says in "The Plant Feeding Gall Midges of North America" that it is a Rhopalomyia sp. but he goes on to say that Diarthronomyia is a subgenus of Rhopalomyia

Images of this individual: tag all
Cecidomyiidae, galls on Lead Plant - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha Cecidomyiidae, galls on Lead Plant - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha Cecidomyiidae, gall on Lead Plant, larva - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha Cecidomyiidae, gall on Lead Plant, larva - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha Cecidomyiidae, Lead Plant gall larvaX - Rhopalomyia undescribed-species-on-amorpha

Moved
Moved from Rhopalomyia.

Moved
Moved from Gall Midges.

ID uncertain
It sounds to me as if Gagne is doubtful that these galls are caused by a Rhopalomyia: "...but the gall makers were apparently not preserved. Rhopalomyia spp. are associated principally with Asteraceae" [whereas Amorpha is in Fabaceae]. Even if the genus is correct, the species is unknown. I'm sure Dr. Gagne would be interested in seeing a specimen if you succeed in rearing adults.

 
Thank you. I'm going to keep
Thank you.
I'm going to keep trying to raise these, if not this year then another. I still have some galls, some browning by now but some still reddish. So, for now, ID is unknown, except to family?

 
Placement
I guess it wouldn't hurt to move the images to Rhopalomyia, since as far as is known these galls are made by a midge in that genus. I was just pointing out that Gagne seems to be somewhat skeptical of this. But we can always fix it if/when new information comes to light.

 
Another thought
If you find these again, I think Dr. Gagne would be able to at least confirm the genus if he was able to examine larvae preserved in alcohol, so it's worth collecting those in addition to trying to rear adults.

 
You are correct.
He does a lot from the larvae. I'll put it on the list.

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