Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#275990
Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - male

Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - Male
Pearl River County, Mississippi, USA
May 16, 2009
Size: 6mm BL
Found between 2 oak leaves.

Images of this individual: tag all
Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - male Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - male Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - male Verrucosa arenata? - Verrucosa arenata - male

Moved
Moved from Spiders.

My conclusion is based on this image below
in which I think I can see the thornlike protrusions
on legs 2.

 
I agree
there are protrusions on the spider you are using for comparison (I lightened it in photoshopped and can see them clearly). I don't know if anything else looks like this, but this seems like a good ID to me.

 
Thanks , You are always a great help
here,this one may help for future ids of an adult male.

 
Levi 1976
Levi (1976) confirms this (2nd tibia) and adds that arenata is the only Verrucosa species occurring north of Mexico (essentially the eastern US, with Iowa as the northwest point, and then south to Panama and including Cuba).

He also adds:
Verrucosa arenata makes a large, loose web low in trees each morning or evening and removes it after sunrise; this species rests head up in its web, the reverse of the usual orb-weaver resting position. (Could be added to the info page if it's not already there.)

Thanks for photographing this interesting specimen.

-K

 
Thanks Lynette and Kevin, its odd where I found
this,I can say that they must be the main target for spider wasp here,
I examined a few spider wasp nest which were full of
Verrucosa.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.