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Genus Hemileuca

New England Buck Moth - Hemileuca lucina - male New England Buck Moth - Hemileuca lucina - male Annual outbreak of buckmoths. - Hemileuca maia Spiny guy! - Hemileuca Nevada Buck Moth? - Hemileuca nevadensis moth at blacklight - Hemileuca tricolor - male Hemileuca Caterpillars in circle formation - Hemileuca
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Bombycoidea (Silkworm, Sphinx, and Royal Moths)
Family Saturniidae (Giant Silkworm and Royal Moths)
Subfamily Hemileucinae (Buck and Io Moths)
Tribe Hemileucini
Genus Hemileuca
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Hemileuca Walker, 1855
Numbers
Nearctica (1) lists 23 species.
Remarks
Hybrid pairing:
Print References
Covell, pp. 48-49, plate 9, illustrates three eastern species. (2)
Wagner, p. 21--caterpillars of H. maia and H. lucina (3)
Himmelman, p. 122, pp. 195-196, . (4)
Miller and Hammond, Macromoths of Northwest Forests and Woodlands, #232, p. 107. (5) Photo of H. eglanterina, discussion of others.
Powell and Hogue, pp. 229-230, figs. 292-293, illustrate and describe H. nevadensis, H. eglanterina. (6)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Nearctica: Nomina Insecta Nearctica
2.Peterson Field Guides: Eastern Moths
Charles V. Covell. 1984. Houghton Mifflin Company.
3.Caterpillars of Eastern Forests
David L. Wagner, Valerie Giles, Richard C. Reardon, Michael L. McManus. 1998. U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team.
4.Discovering Moths: Nighttime Jewels in Your Own Backyard
John Himmelman. 2002. Down East Books.
5.Macromoths of Northwest Forests and Woodlands
Jeffrey Miller, Paul Hammond. 2000. USDA Forest Service, FHTET-98-18.
6.California Insects
Jerry A. Powell, Charles L. Hogue. 1989. University of California Press.