Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#277165
Tenebrionid, Trichoton sordidum - Trichoton sordidum

Tenebrionid, Trichoton sordidum - Trichoton sordidum
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, San Diego County, California, USA
April 23, 2009
Size: BL about 8 mm
We saw this beetle on a dirt road in Vallecito Ranch in the Park. The pronotum with its lateral flanges, the way the pronotum frames the head and the slightly clubbed antennae all add up to a new family for me. It resembles most an Endomychidae, but none in this family that I have seen illustrated have rugged rather rugose elytra. Any help will be much appreciated.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tenebrionid, Trichoton sordidum - Trichoton sordidum Trichoton sordidum, Tenebrionidae - Trichoton sordidum

Endomychids...
...are smaller, glabrous, usually naked, often bright-colored beetles, mostly assoc'd with fungi

 
Endomychids....
Thanks for the info on Endomychids. All the literature and illustrations of them that I could find seemed to indicate the smooth elytra, but I wondered if there could be an exception. Also, this beetle was found in the desert where we've never seen a fungus beetle. Tenebrionid makes a lot more sense. But it is hard to see the shelf over the antennal insertions.

How about the tenebrionid
Trichoton sordidum?

 
Trichoton sordidum
Yes! I checked out the genus/species on BugGuide and saw M. Brummermann's photo of the same beetle,taken in a desert canyon near Tucson, just five days earlier than we saw our beetle, also in the desert. Thank you!

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.