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Species Corythucha juglandis - Walnut Lace Bug

Lace bug - Corythucha juglandis Walnut Lace Bug - Corythucha juglandis Walnut Lace Bug - Corythucha juglandis lacebug - Corythucha juglandis Corythucha, I presume - Corythucha juglandis Lace Bug - Corythucha juglandis A̶p̶h̶i̶d̶s̶ Lace Bug on Juglans cinerea - Corythucha juglandis Walnut lace bug  - Corythucha juglandis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Cimicomorpha
Superfamily Miroidea
Family Tingidae (Lace Bugs)
Subfamily Tinginae
Tribe Tingini
Genus Corythucha
Species juglandis (Walnut Lace Bug)
Explanation of Names
Corythucha juglandis (Fitch 1856)
Range
throughout the range of black walnut(1)
Food
hosts: almost exclusively, black walnut(1)
Remarks
"Both adults and nymphs are found together on the lower surfaces of walnut leaflets where they suck the sap from the leaves. More than 100 nymphs and adults may be present at one time on one leaflet. Areas where they have fed are easily recognized because of cast skins, excrement, and dark, discolored patches of leaf. The upper leaf surface is stippled with tiny white spots that give the upper leaf surface a whitish appearance. Leaves of heavily infested trees may turn brown and fall off."(1)