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Photo#285365
ladybird with parasite - Dinocampus coccinellae

ladybird with parasite - Dinocampus coccinellae
fayetteville, washington County, Arkansas, USA
June 4, 2009
Coleomegilla maculata with Dinocampus coccinellae cocoon... and something else.

Images of this individual: tag all
ladybird with parasite - Dinocampus coccinellae ladybird with parasite - Coleomegilla maculata ladybird with parasite - Coleomegilla maculata ladybird with parasite - Coleomegilla maculata ladybird with parasite - Coleomegilla maculata ladybird with parasite - Coleomegilla maculata

Moved

Moved

Moved

Puzzling...
I wonder if they're cocoons of a hyperparasitoid? I would expect those to be inside the Dinocampus coccinellae cocoon though. They almost look like they could be droppings, but that seems a little weird too. Are you hanging onto this to see what happens?

 
ladybird
i did pick it up and now have it in a jar to see if anything else happens. i am not even sure if the D. coccinellae has left. the ladybird is already dead, the next to last picture shows a hole in the front of the left elytra... however, i am not sure what caused that.

i was thinking the ladybird was a parasite victim twice... one very unlucky beetle.

 
Posting
Perhaps it would be a good idea to move at least some of these to Dinocampus coccinellae. They are more valuable there than here, I think.

 
I agree
As a start, the first image has been moved over.

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