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Photo#286753
little spider, big mouthparts - Araneus cingulatus

little spider, big mouthparts - Araneus cingulatus
Prospect Hill, Caswell County, North Carolina, USA
June 10, 2009
Size: 3mm

Images of this individual: tag all
little spider, big mouthparts - Araneus cingulatus little spider, big mouthparts - Araneus cingulatus little spider, big mouthparts - Araneus cingulatus

Moved

The big mouthparts are the enlarged palps
of a male. These are sperm transfer organs. The pattern on the back leads us to guess an orb weaver in the genus Araneus. It will be interesting to see what Lynette says.

 
i'll move it
over to Araneus for now

 
Araneus cingulatus or Araneus partitus
If I had to guess I'd say Araneus cingulatus or Araneus partitus.

 
We just made the holding bin
so we could gather all these green Araneus together and study them, not because we actually knew anything about how many species there were. Feel free to delete the bin if you like. We haven't looked at it in a long time.

 
no you were right
I looked again....and was editing my comment about the holding bin as you were replying. I see there are at least two species that look very similar. Now I also see Araneus bonsallae and juniperi also look pretty similar as well.

 
well gosh
I am apparently all about some bug fornication tonight on my uploads... whee!

 
Not quite yet -- it's a subad
Not quite yet -- it's a subadult male.

-K

 
hahaha
Age doesn't usually stop a male of any species

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