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Photo#288313
Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male

Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - Male
Lacey (near Olympia), Thurston County, Washington, USA
March 12, 2009
Chen (et al),
Sorry to put so many photos, but I didn't know which would be most helpful. Let me know which, if any, are worth keeping, and I'll frass the rest. I've also got lots of closeups on this fellow, so holler if a particular part being blown up would help.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male Pachyneurid Fly - Cramptonomyia spenceri - male

Moved
Moved from Tipulomorpha.

You have
got yourself a Cramptonomyia spenceri in family Pachyneuridae. All images are helpful for this unusual fly. - Chen

 
trio of ocelli
Couple questions:
1) So, I take it that even though this *looks* a lot like a crane fly, it is just a "fly" or pachyneurid fly?
2) I noticed on my closeup images (and on Lynette's) that these guys have a clear trio of ocelli that remind me of hymenoptera. Do all flies have this feature? Do crane flies? Do all insects?

Thanks as always, Chen (and everyone else).

 
There are certain characters
that entomologists use to separate flies of different families, and wing venation is one of them. Based on wing venation alone one can tell the pachyneurid fly from crane fly easily. Notice also that the pachyneurid fly you have is a male and Lynette has a female. A close look of both you will notice that the male has longer antennae.

Many flies have ocelli but not crane flies, that is one of the characters use to set crane flies apart from all the other related flies. Here is a key that you may find additional information on crane flies. - Chen

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