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Photo#291373
Shiny green-tinted beetle - Scelolyperus

Shiny green-tinted beetle - Scelolyperus
Sunderland, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
June 20, 2009
Size: 3.8-4.5 mm
These were common. I saw two or three on leaves and one landed on my pants. (Most species I see no more than one of per day.)

Images of this individual: tag all
Shiny green-tinted beetle - Scelolyperus Shiny green-tinted beetle - Scelolyperus

Moved

galerucine -- suspect Scelolyperus meracus (Say)
any host plant info?

 
Host plant...
...might be birch.

Obviously hard to tell the tree species from such a tiny view (in plant photo), but one helpful character is that the margin of the leaf in that photo is doubly serrate (big teeth have smaller teeth on them). Among the species that have this trait are elms and birches. Given the habitat of this specimen (summit of 1200' mountain in Massachusetts), it might not be too big of a leap of faith to think it might be a birch (Betula). Interestingly, a Google Search for the leaf beetle species suspected by =v= (Scelolyperus meracus) led to this article by Clark (1996), which cited Wilcox (1965) that a recorded host was Gray Birch (Betula populifolia).

 
Scelolyperus sp. --det. S.M. Clark

I've also seen lots of these in the past few days,
Will be interested to find out just what beetle this is.

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