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Photo#291758
Larvae? Millipede?

Larvae? Millipede?
Madsion, Lake County, South Dakota, USA
June 1, 2009
Size: less than 1/2 inch
this slow moving bug/worm has random hairs on it's back. Mostly dark brown on the back and cream colored on the belly. Seems to have 6 legs and can easily curl up. The one shown is less than half an inch and the rest are much smaller ranging in size all the way down to an eyelash. They seem to be found in all different rooms of the house.

Moved
Moved from Carpet Beetles.

Maybe a carpet beetle
This reminds me of a Carpet Beetle(1) larva, but not one I've seen before.

It is not a millipede. Millipedes have two legs on all or nearly all of their body segments. This has six proper legs in total, like most insects. (Caterpillars have bumps called "prolegs" that are not considered legs because they do not have joints.)

 
Thank you!
After researching carpet beetles, i have found much research that leads me to believe that you are correct. I have found this link:

http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef601.asp

that explains a lot and the picture of the larva that is shown looks like what i have but just in the immature stage.

Thanks again for your help!

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