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Species Dytiscus dauricus

Dytiscid - Dytiscus dauricus - female Dytiscus ??? - Dytiscus dauricus - female Dytiscus dauricus - female Dytiscus dauricus - female Unknown Dytiscus - Dytiscus dauricus - male Dystichus daricus??? - Dytiscus dauricus Dytiscidae in Yellowknife - Dytiscus dauricus Dytiscidae in Yellowknife - Dytiscus dauricus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Adephaga (Ground and Water Beetles)
Family Dytiscidae (Predaceous Diving Beetles)
Subfamily Dytiscinae
Genus Dytiscus
Species dauricus (Dytiscus dauricus)
Explanation of Names
Dytiscus dauricus (Gebler 1832)
Size
29.7-40 mm(1) (our largest dytiscid)
Identification
Broadly elongate and very large; metacoxal lobes acuminate, ventral colouration with pale with expanded black markings on abdominal sterna; pronotum broadly rimmed with yellow.
Most similar to D. alaskanus but can be separated based on the size difference and differences in female secondary sexual characteristics (1); males most reliably separated via genitalia characters (1).
Sulcate females of D. dauricus have ridges 7 and 10 fused apically but 8 and 9 not fused; sulcate D. alaskanus females have both ridges 7 and 10 fused and 8 & 9 fused (1).
Range
holarctic; North America: transcontinental in Canada and Alaska (1) south to CA-AZ in the west and to IL & NY in the east(1)
Habitat
permanent ponds in forested areas; also beaver ponds(1)
Food
reported to prey on larval salamanders (Holomuzki 1985, Holomuzki 1986)
Print References
Holomuzki J.R. (1985) Life history aspects of the predaceous diving beetle, Dytiscus dauricus (Gebler), in Arizona. The Southwestern Naturalist 30: 485-490.
Holomuzki J.R. (1986) Predator avoidance and diet patterns of microhabitat use by larval salamanders. Ecology 67: 737-748.
Internet References