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Photo#29541
red-waisted spider - Larinioides sclopetarius

red-waisted spider - Larinioides sclopetarius
Tobermory, Bruce, Ontario, Canada
August 10, 2005
Size: body length 10 mm
In company of about 50 others on wall of motel that kept its exterior lights on all night. These spiders were only present at night. I suppose they captured a good number of moths and other insects that were attracted to the lights, making daytime hunting unnecessary (?)

Moved
Moved from Furrow spiders.

Are these two
Robin's and Mike's in the same genus, Metepeira, as ?

 
I believe
Robin's image is Larinioides, but not 100% certain.

 
Nice call
It does look very much like the image of the male Larinioides in Spiders of the Eastern US, Howell and Jenkins, page 172

 
We found an image of Araneus sericata
that looked just like this. However, it's new name is apparently -
Larinioides sclopetaria (Clerck, 1757)
Synonymy -
Araneus sericatus Clerck, 1757
Araneus sclopetarius Clerck, 1757
Aranea undata Olivier, 1789
Nuctenea sclopetaria (Clerck, 1757)
Range:
BC, WA, ID, UT, OK, WI, MI, IL, IN, OH, KY, WV, VA, PA, NY, ON, PQ, MA, VT, NH, CT, RI, ME, NS, NB, NF
When we searched online we didn't find any images, but when we searched for L. sclopetarius, we found dozens of images from Europe. Not sure what it all means, but that's what we found.
Common names are Gray Cross Spider and Clerk's Bridge Spider

 
Thanks...
J & J - and J! Image moved from Araneidae to Larinioides page.

 
Beats me
There's no info on Metepeira in the Guide; how is it distinguished from other genera?

Orb Weaver
What a cool looking Orb Weaver! This is definitely an Orb Weaver (Araneidae), and you can see the web it is sitting on (contrasted by the shadow on the wall). As to which genus... not sure. (Probably Neoscona or Araneus).

Many of the orb weavers that resemble this are nocturnal hunters, so they "have seen the light", and know when its time to eat... :)

Question:
It also looks like it might be preparing to molt. It looks like the "tissue" on all of the legs (specifically the fourth segment (patella)) is splitting. (I am not too familar with the finer details of the molting process, but is it preparing to molt?)

 
I see what you mean
...in the knee area, but I don't know what's going on there.
The pattern on the abdomen looks familiar to me; it's the red triangle in the middle that I don't recall seeing before. I was hoping it was a distinguishing feature that someone would recognize.

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