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Photo#301422
An orangish leafhopper - Pagaronia triunata

An orangish leafhopper - Pagaronia triunata
South-east of Half Moon Bay, along Tunitas Creek Rd, in the Santa Cruz Mountains, San Mateo County, California, USA
June 27, 2009
This nymph was perched on the leaf of a sedge (Carex sp.) immediately adjacent to the leafhopper pictured in the first two images in this series, and others nearby.

Images of this individual: tag all
An orangish leafhopper - Pagaronia triunata An orangish leafhopper - Pagaronia triunata An orangish leafhopper - Pagaronia triunata

Life stages...
It's always so nice to be able to connect nymphs and adults with each other. I assume given the proximity of this young one to the adults and the matching pattern of spots on the head that they are indeed related. A great addition to the library of images for this species!

 
My sentiments exactly...
...and I presumed they were the same species for the reasons you cited.

What's bugging me though is that I didn't collect any material to key that darn Carex to species :-)

However, I wonder whether that youngster was actually feeding on the Carex? Or just resting there momentarily? It would seem to be a tougher-tissued, less juicy, food choice than the Aralia leaf its brethren was on. (Besides, being in the Ginseng family, the Aralia might provide a nice boost in vitality & longitivity...not to mention Cicadellid mood-enhancement :-)

Moved
Moved from Leafhoppers.

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