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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#30470
bright green spider - Araneus cingulatus

bright green spider - Araneus cingulatus
Windham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA
August 28, 2005
Size: <5mm abdomen
Found clinging to my van that was parked under oak trees. Could possibly have ridden to Windham from Nashua, NH, where van was also parked under oak tree.

Moved
Moved from Araneus partitus.

Moved
Moved from Araneus cingulatus.

 
Excellent!
We knew we'd get you hooked on Araneus again! It's great that you are getting these guys/gals sorted out. Thanks!

 
Yeah
This is all your fault! ;)
Unfortunately that might be it for now, but I'll keep tyring.

A very similar image
was identified as Araneus cingulatus, check . Also very similar to the image in the new Kansas School Naturalist publication Vol 52 No 2

 
It does seem like it must be in that genus
but I think I'll let it stay where it is till our "expert" comes along.

btw, for beetle IDs I've actively hunted down specialists on the Internet and asked them to take a look. I think Don Chandler, coleopterist at the University of New Hampshire, is a regular IDer in the beetles section now in large part because of my interactions with him. Doug Yanega paid us a recent visit after one of my mass mailings to coleopterists. Andrew Cline was referred to us by a mentor of his who was on my specialist list. A.G. Kiertchuk (I've surely butchered his name) from www.zin.ru in Russia is a nitidulid specialist who's volunteered to ID stuff for us. I hope to get Dan Young, who did a lion's share of the work on American Beetles after Arnett's death, to visit the site now and then. He's IDed a number of things for me by E-mail.

My point is that, with a good sales pitch, we can interest and elicit help from some top people involved with Arthropod taxonomy. Whenever I do a mass mailing I visit the statistics page for some numbers (images, pages, hits, contributors, etc.) the better to impress them with bugguide's uniqueness and increasing value as an image database.

Looks similar to species
in the guide under Araniella here, but we don't really know. Still waiting for an orb weaver expert to show up and identify these for us.

 
green lynx spider (Peucetia viridans)
I had one show up here in NC along the edge of a potted plant. Found its identification here: http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/beneficial/green_lynx_spider.htm

Nice pictures here: http://www.rochedalss.qld.edu.au/lynx.htm

 
Green yes, Lynx no
Body shape and leg proportions don't match.

 
We'll stick with Orb weaver
It is certainly green as are some lynx spiders, but we don't believe this one is a Lynx. Any thoughts from the spider experts?

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