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Photo#305494
Predaceous Diving Beetle - Colymbetes densus

Predaceous Diving Beetle - Colymbetes densus
Pack Forest, near Eatonville, Pierce County, Washington, USA
July 11, 2009
Size: circa 14 mm
Captured by a young naturalist in the big pond, I believe. I think this is a Dytiscid, but corrections welcome. The corrugated pattern (view full-size if you can) on the elytra looks distinctive, but I don't see anything like it in the guide. Size estimated--it was medium or large-sized. (See comments for ID.)

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Predaceous Diving Beetle - Colymbetes densus Predaceous Diving Beetle - Colymbetes densus Predaceous Diving Beetle - Colymbetes densus

Moved
Moved from Colymbetes.

Moved

Colymbetes
The transverse grooves on the elytra are unmistakable for this genus. Might be new to the guide.

 
And it turns out it is..
This is Colymbetes densus densus (LeConte), a western species. Subspecies densus is more northernly in distribution (to Alaska) while subspecies inaequalis is southern (OR and CA). In this species, the frons is swollen (rather protruding) in front of the eyes. Nice find!

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