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Photo#312133
NOT a Vespula squamosa  -- some type of clearwing moth - Sesia tibiale

NOT a Vespula squamosa -- some type of clearwing moth - Sesia tibiale
Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado, USA
July 29, 2009
Size: 2 cm
This one was found in my back yard. It did not move no matter how close the camera got.
It moved only when I prodded it gently with a twig, and even then did not fly, just walked away from the twig. From what I have read, it belongs in Florida, and maybe it was just cold (temperature was 60 degrees F, and had been a rain shower shortly before.)
Does it belong in Colorado? Is it male or female, and how do I tell the difference?

Images of this individual: tag all
NOT a Vespula squamosa  -- some type of clearwing moth - Sesia tibiale NOT a Vespula squamosa -- some type of clearwing moth. - Sesia tibiale

Moved
Moved from Sesioidea.

Moth ID
This is a female Sesia tibialis. The larvae feed on cottonwood and aspen.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Fooled you!
This is actually a type of clearwing moth. There are many different species that seem to mimic yellowjackets, so hopefully a moth expert will be able to tell you more
http://bugguide.net/node/view/161

 
Hmmmm.
Now that you pointed that out, I can see at least one difference between
this and what it should look like if it was a Yellowjacket.
Yes, I got fooled. Not too hard to do.

 
Not too hard at all
I was glancing through ID request and thought this was a yellowjacket until I clicked to enlarge the image

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